Author Topic: Calcsys  (Read 6197 times)

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Offline josephmarin

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Calcsys
« on: April 09, 2007, 05:57:00 am »
I love Calcsys. I like to go in and cheat at TVF and other nifty games, but what else could one do with such a groovy resource?  
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Offline Halifax

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Calcsys
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2007, 08:23:00 am »
Ummm you can disassemble the calc OS. You can disassemble your favorite application or any program on your calculator. It can help you out with doing assembly, And I think you can edit character sets on it but I am not sure. I started a disassembly of Xlib, but 20 lines in decided to call it quits. But Iambian did a full disassembly of MirageOS source code.
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Offline Iambian

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Calcsys
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2007, 09:53:00 am »
I'd like to say "HI!" since it's my first (real) time I've posted on this board. Just had to try it out after registering :)smile.gif

But at any rate, I can disassemble just about anything for you. Or I could just upload to my site the utility that I used to perform the disassembly with. The latter is much more fun, since you absolutely *have* to use Calcsys to get it to do what you want, plus you have to "prime" the program in order for it to create what you need to change. (see! it's somewhat on topic!). For the utility, just make sure you have enough free ARC since the disassembly files are dumped there per iteration. Then, it's your responsibility to send to your computer to format and put in a text file. I have an mIRC script for that purpose.

Usually, I use Calcsys to do quick references, such as how many bytes I need to skip in an archived variable before I can get to read the program data, what the keycodes are for the particular key(s) I need, find out what Celtic can do if I just modify the symbol table myself, edit a few things in preexisting projects when I have no computer to recompile and send to my calc, among other things.

For the ASM developer, Calcsys is indispensible. It is just as much as a friend as Google is. Perhaps even moreso.
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Offline calc84maniac

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Calcsys
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2007, 10:10:00 am »
I agree COMPLETELY. (especially cause I do all my programming oncalc XDsmiley.gif)
"Most people ask, 'What does a thing do?' Hackers ask, 'What can I make it do?'" - Pablos Holman

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Calcsys
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2007, 02:50:00 pm »
Even ASM?  What about crashes?  That's a lot of archive writes to have to back up every time before you test out a change to your program... (correct me if I'm wrong)

Offline Iambian

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Calcsys
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2007, 03:25:00 pm »
QuoteBegin-Insanity+9 Apr, 2007, 20:5-->
QUOTE (Insanity @ 9 Apr, 2007, 20:50)
Even ASM?  What about crashes?  That's a lot of archive writes to have to back up every time before you test out a change to your program... (correct me if I'm wrong)  

 *ESPECIALLY* ASM programs. Besides, the reasonable things you'd be editing would be numerical boundries and such. The chances of causing a crash if you're aware of what you are doing are small if you know you're doing something that won't cause such a thing. Now, if you were doing something that you know might cause a problem, then I can see where you're getting at.

But the kind of editing that I normally do are safe. If I do something that crashes the calc, then I know the next time I go back to the computer to make a certain change. You see, the most valuable aspect of debugging an ASM program is to make sure that the calc crashes if anything goes wrong. If it doesn't crash, then the programmer remains oblivious to any potential problems that may be experienced.
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Offline calc84maniac

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Calcsys
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2007, 01:28:00 am »
I use Omnicalc's Ram Recovery so I don't have to archive everything. :)smile.gif
"Most people ask, 'What does a thing do?' Hackers ask, 'What can I make it do?'" - Pablos Holman

Offline Netham45

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Calcsys
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2007, 02:09:00 am »
I use calcsys for a number guessing game.

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Offline Iambian

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Calcsys
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2007, 10:09:00 am »
QuoteBegin-calc84maniac+10 Apr, 2007, 7:28-->
QUOTE (calc84maniac @ 10 Apr, 2007, 7:28)
I use Omnicalc's Ram Recovery so I don't have to archive everything. :)smile.gif

 There will soon be a program that'll compete with the same RAM space that Omnicalc uses for RAM Recovery. But that's on a different topic.

I also use Calcsys to inspect memory addresses and areas around where a utility should've edited. I do this so that variables unreadable in the BASIC editor would be readable through this. I mean, I do want to make sure that what I wrote creates and edits in the proper fashion. This also helps in debugging.
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