Author Topic: The ** Command  (Read 3892 times)

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Offline nemo

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The ** Command
« on: July 21, 2010, 01:35:48 am »
Hey guys, so i've been messing around with the **  command in axe parser to help anyone who may want to figure out how to use it, or at least understand it primitively. so here are 90 minutes worth of observations i've made by testing dozens of axe programs, and then PM'd to quigibo to make sure they're correct observations, which was OK'd.

The ** Command

the documentation reads: "The signed multiplication is performed using the high byte as the integer part and the low byte as the decimal part returning a number in the same format."
here's a quick way to transfer a decimal number into something axe parser will understand. say you wanted to multiply 2.5 and 3.5. That's 8.75, you say, being superb at arithmetic. well, let's see how we can get axe to do it for us: first, break this down starting with the number 2 and one half. second, we take one half. since this is the first 8 bits, which holds the values 0-255, after that point it overflows into the next byte which holds the integer part two. this is better represented in binary:

  0    0    0     0     0      0    0     0    | 0     0     0     0     0    0    0    0
32768 16384 8192  4096  2048  1024  512    256 | 128   64    32    16    8    4    2    1  

                                                          
the line separates the high and low bytes. since we want to display one half in the lower byte to the right, we need one half of it. since the lower byte can represent 0-255, or 256 values, to get one half we'll have to divide 256 by two. so we end up with 128. then we need to represent 2 in the higher byte. you'll notice if we divide all the values of the higher byte by 256, they become identical to the lower byte. (32768/256=128, 16384/256=64, etc.) therefore, if we look at the lower byte, figure out what number we're trying to represent (in this case, it's two) and multiply it by 256, we'll get the higher-byte equivalent. which is 2 * 256 so 512. 512+128 = 640. great. we have one number, 2.5. now we need to multiply it by 3.5 do the same thing. what's .5 on our lower-byte scale? 128. and now we add that to 3 * 256, which is 768. total, that's 896. great. now try out this program:
Code: [Select]
.EXAMPLE
640->A  . 2 and a half
896->B  . 3 and a half
Disp A**B>Dec
What does it give? it gives 2240. look back at the commands list. it says it will give a number in the same format. therefore, to decode it, all you need to do is divide by 256. you'll notice you get 8.75. which is.. 3.5 * 2.5 (:
so you have a number x, and a number y. and you want to use this program without thinking in binary. here's the quick way, assuming x and y are in base 10 with decimal parts, just multiply them by 256 to get numbers that the ** command understands. 2.5 * 256 = 640, and 3.5 * 256 = 896.

Quigibo also gave me a quick BASIC program that will convert a number from -128 through 128 into 8.8 form (the form Axe reads in).
with the number in Ans:
Code: [Select]
If Ans<-128 or Ans>128:Then
Disp "OUT OF RANGE
Return
End
Ans+256(Ans<0
256iPart(Ans)+iPart(256fPart(Ans

and Quigibo's way to go from 8.8 back to decimal:
Code: [Select]
ClrHome
Input "8.8:",A
If A>=2^16
Then
Disp "OUT OF RANGE!"
Stop
End
If A>=2^15:Then
Disp -(2^16-A)/256    . this is a negative, not a minus sign
Else
Disp A/256
End

« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 02:05:08 am by nemo »


Offline Quigibo

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Re: The ** Command
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2010, 01:39:15 am »
Great tutorial Nemo!  :D

Here it is in as a full TI-BASIC program.
EDIT: Also, I uploaded a converter to go the other way.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 01:50:39 am by Quigibo »
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Offline nemo

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Re: The ** Command
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2010, 01:47:08 am »
Thanks quigibo!
I edited the BASIC program to act the same as the one you posted.


Offline ztrumpet

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Re: The ** Command
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2010, 12:23:38 pm »
Nice job Nemo!  Thanks! ;D

Offline calcdude84se

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Re: The ** Command
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2010, 12:24:37 pm »
Cool! This'll definitely be helpful for those who are having trouble understanding. :)
Great job!
« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 12:25:10 pm by calcdude84se »
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Re: The ** Command
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2010, 12:35:04 pm »
Sadly I had no luck understanding :(

The command is probably simply way beyond my learning capabilities, so I better stay away from it, especially that it is not essential for my calc game. However, nice job explaining to other people.
In case you are wondering where I went, I left Omni back in 2015 to form CodeWalrus due to various reasons explained back then, but I stopped calc dev in 2016 and am now mostly active on the CW Discord server at https://discord.gg/cuZcfcF



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